The Apex Book of World SF 2 Released!

My new anthology, The Apex Book of World SF 2, is now officially out! It is now on Amazon and Amazon UK, in Kindle and paperback editions, or can be ordered directly from the publisher.

 

Table of Contents:

  1. “Alternate Girl’s Expatriate Life” by Rochita Loenen-Ruiz
  2. “Mr. Goop” by Ivor W. Hartmann
  3. “Trees of Bone” by Daliso Chaponda
  4. “The First Peruvian in Space” by Daniel Salvo (translated by Jose B. Adolph)
  5. “Eyes in the Vastness of Forever” by Gustavo Bondoni
  6. “The Tomb” by Chen Qiufan (translated by the author)
  7. “The Sound of Breaking Glass” by Joyce Chng
  8. “A Single Year” by Csilla Kleinheincz (translated by the author)
  9. “The Secret Origin of Spin-Man” by Andrew Drilon
  10. “Borrowed Time” by Anabel Enríquez Piñeiro (translated by Daniel W. Koon)
  11. “Branded” by Lauren Beukes
  12. “December 8th” by Raúl Flores (translated by Daniel W. Koon)
  13. “Hungry Man” by Will Elliott
  14. “Nira and I” by Shweta Narayan
  15. “Nothing Happened in 1999” by Fábio Fernandes
  16. “Shadow” by Tade Thompson
  17. “Shibuya no Love” by Hannu Rajaniemi
  18. “Maquech” by Silvia Moreno-Garcia
  19. “The Glory of the World” by Sergey Gerasimov
  20. “The New Neighbours” by Tim Jones
  21. “From the Lost Diary of TreeFrog7” by Nnedi Okorafor
  22. “The Slows” by Gail Hareven (translated by Yaacov Jeffrey Green)
  23. “Zombie Lenin” by Ekaterina Sedia
  24. “Electric Sonalika” by Samit Basu
  25. “The Malady” by Andrzej Sapkowski (translated by Wiesiek Powaga)
  26. “A Life Made Possible Behind The Barricades” by Jacques Barcia

Publishers Weekly starred review:

Apex’s second international anthology hits the right chord for readers looking for mostly non-Western perspectives on science fiction and the world at large. Some stories are original to this anthology; others appear in their first English translation. Cultural roots may not always be obvious, but they run deep in most of the stories, and all illuminate traditional storytelling and new ideas. In Ivor W. Hartmann’s “Mr. Goop,” young Tamuka comes to realize the worth of an embarrassing Geneform servant in a post–climate change world. The title characters of Shweta Narayan’s “Nira and I” find freedom through a mist they believe comes from a beloved honor-murdered family member. Nnedi Okorafor’s “From the Lost Diary of TreeFrog7” chronicles the hunt for an ancient master CPU on a world of organic technology. Each story pushes past established boundaries, bringing readers experiences that are unique and familiar all at once. (Oct.)